Right to travel

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 3:46 pm

musashi,

To try and keep things very simple whilst understanding that this could be hard to do...

You stated: "The constitution and the common law so far prevent this."

Please tell me what the constitution and common law is?
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Dreadlock » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:02 pm

Thanks, I'm aware of that Ingy but the common law doesn't go back to the days of the druids so I saw little point in mentioning it. By 1066 England was very much a Christian country with the church having been established for a good 500 years. Doubtless pockets of paganism still existed. Even after 1066 Anglo-Saxon culture and law was prominent for a good couple of hundred years - Henry I made it clear that the laws of Edward the Confessor were to remain in place. Anglo-Saxon and Norman laws were gradually merged creating what we now call the common law and which is largely based on Christian beliefs as both the Normans and Anglo-Saxons were Christian.

So the common law is the customs, traditions and law of the merged Anglo-Saxon and Norman cultures - based on Christian beliefs.
Last edited by Dreadlock on Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Dreadlock
 
Posts: 453
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:08 am

Re: Right to travel

Postby musashi » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:09 pm

The constitution of the United Kingdom is the set of laws and principles under which the United Kingdom is governed and which sets out the limitations of the crown and its parliament. There is no single document defining this but a series of charters, statutes and law court decisions exist which does. Huntingross's post on the limitations of parliament help here. It is also in the the Billl of Rights, which was determined by a convention of the people and not of parliament.

The common law may be said to be that which Alfred the Great set out according to the wishes of his people on how they wish to be governed and what laws shall bind them. The common law is that which governs the interactive relations of people not in commerce, contract or other jurisdiction. It is the law by which people choose to live.

Can't get it any simpler, though I am a simple man. I can also say that I believe that the first law to exist was contract law. The law of agreement.

Musashi
It's still fucked, isn't it?
User avatar
musashi
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1121
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2009 6:21 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:12 pm

Dreadlock,

You stated: "The common law is an amalgamation of Anglo-Saxon and Norman laws, customs and traditions. It is largely unwritten, though as a Christian country our laws are based heavily on bible teachings which are considered to be the highest law as they represent the word of God. Statutes on the other hand are the lowest of the laws of the land - even though they are written down."

What are the exact written amalgimation of Anglo-Saxon and Norman laws you refer to?

I have read a little deeper on common law and its definition in the latest Oxford English Dictionary informs us that common law was taken and written from local customs of England. (unwritten common law I presume)
This leads me to ask, how do we know what the customs were? which I presume the answer should be that they became written in our early charters yes?
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Dreadlock » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:17 pm

Alfred the Great did do much towards creating a common law and it should be noted that as a younger brother he was destined for life as a Christian monk - until his elder brother died.
But the common law as we know it does have significant Norman input.

Common law developed over centuries via case-law. This is where it is written.

Ingy. No! Customs and traditions are passed on from generation to generation via practice. They do not need to be written down. We know what they are because we are told and shown what they are.
"Primitive" cultures have traditions dating back thousands of years and passed on purely by practice.

This insistence that things must be written down is a "modern" phenomena.

Can an illiterate man not be free?
Dreadlock
 
Posts: 453
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:08 am

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:31 pm

Dreadlock,

You stated: "Thanks, I'm aware of that Ingy but the common law doesn't go back to the days of the druids..."

Sorry to labour this point Dreadlock but this is something I do know a lot about via DIY study and not state study :yes: ...
You have gone too far back their Dreadlock, Druids were of the Celtic Brit tribes not of the Anglo-Saxon tribes who were North Germanic tribes in origin. Druids were pre-449 the beginnings of English history in what became England as named by the English. It was first named after the Engle tribe, the largest of the Anglo-Saxons tribes: Engleland which became Englalond and then England over time with the change in English language from Old English to middle English and now modern English.

Common law did start with the English from around 449 onwards but as you note they soon became converted on mass to Christianity within a few hundred years of settlement. Some early English Kings kept some Heathen notions/culture and Christianity is based upon Heathen events if you scratch the surface, but hey that's another story.
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Dreadlock » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:39 pm

Ingy,

You seem to have misunderstood me. I did not say the Druids were Anglo-Saxon... :puzz: They were pretty much eliminated by the Romans before the Anglo-Saxons arrived on the scene.
Dreadlock
 
Posts: 453
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:08 am

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:55 pm

Dreadlock,

You stated: "Customs and traditions are passed on from generation to generation via practice. They do not need to be written down. We know what they are because we are told and shown what they are.
"Primitive" cultures have traditions dating back thousands of years and passed on purely by practice."

So our main argument with statutes and Acts are that they are not of our customs and traditions which are our common law? I.e. the English should be saying our customs and traditions should over-ride (or replace) all these statutes and acts?

Is it your aim for the masses of English and settlers in England who have become part of an English society, to on mass, call for this and that will be the revolution you aim for?

does the movement just want its early English freedoms its enjoyed pre English and then UK Parliament period? If so what are the set customs and traditions (common law) we should be calling for?
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:56 pm

Dreadlock wrote:Ingy,

You seem to have misunderstood me. I did not say the Druids were Anglo-Saxon... :puzz: They were pretty much eliminated by the Romans before the Anglo-Saxons arrived on the scene.


I apologise and agree here.
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

Re: Right to travel

Postby Ingy » Thu Mar 14, 2013 5:16 pm

musashi wrote:The constitution of the United Kingdom is the set of laws and principles under which the United Kingdom is governed and which sets out the limitations of the crown and its parliament. There is no single document defining this but a series of charters, statutes and law court decisions exist which does. Huntingross's post on the limitations of parliament help here. It is also in the the Billl of Rights, which was determined by a convention of the people and not of parliament.

The common law may be said to be that which Alfred the Great set out according to the wishes of his people on how they wish to be governed and what laws shall bind them. The common law is that which governs the interactive relations of people not in commerce, contract or other jurisdiction. It is the law by which people choose to live.

Can't get it any simpler, though I am a simple man. I can also say that I believe that the first law to exist was contract law. The law of agreement.

Musashi


Sorry to be a pain but this is a quite vague definition of common law (My penny not dropping completey)... is it a form of anarchy but just making unwritten rules up as we go along which actually are our customs and traditions that have been taken away from us via Parlaiments?
Is it to not live by all parliament laws? instead to live by our own customs and traditions?
Ingy
 
Posts: 91
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 6:38 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Travel only

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest