The 96 fix

This includes Live Birth Trusts (LBT), and "Accepted for value" (A4V)

Re: The 96 fix

Postby traderfluff » Mon Mar 08, 2010 2:18 pm

96 fixed.............. A4V sucess viewtopic.php?f=48&t=1749&p=43301#p43301 see they are bloody cheques......
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby mark1963 » Wed Mar 10, 2010 8:09 pm

If you have looked at your remittances and bills in the UK, you will see that 73 is the constant number there.

So "73 is the key".

There is a consolidated fund in the UK. It is run by the Comptroller.
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby traderfluff » Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:04 pm

73 is on personal banking cheques, banking only......

its 91 on any debt owed via third parties like utilities, phone.. debt collectors etc
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby mark1963 » Fri Mar 12, 2010 10:06 am

All my bills and remittances have 73 on them - I cannot find 91.

Please advise.
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby traderfluff » Fri Mar 12, 2010 3:22 pm

91 - Conventional Transit Account net credit forwarded.(trans Cash)

not too sure precisely 73 is never came across its description, as this only shows up on personal credit remittance's, but I would be safe to say its still worthless in value and acceptable with just a little more work on the cheque as no defined sum in a BIG BOLD box..
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby mark1963 » Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:10 pm

Could I write in the sum and just then do the other stuff the previous OP did with E:ON?

Or would this not work in your opinion.

73 is on my credit card remittance and I would like to A4V whilst continuing to pay each month. Just as an exercise.
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby nameless » Sat Mar 13, 2010 2:08 pm

Hello mark1963

I have started an afv process on a credit card as well. I sent a reasonable amount AFV with my first Notice and followed up with a Notice of Non-Response and Opp to Cure, and expectation that the AFV will show on the next statement. At the moment I am addressing the Notices to one of the minions with a fancy title.

Would be interested to hear of your results in due course.

I don't know if anyone else has had problems with recorded delivery. I have three outstanding at present that are not being shown up on the track and trace POD. I'm hoping they are just behind with their office work. I've sent an email to the Post Office who have asked to be given time to look into the matter.

Glad to see that the forum is back again.
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby somenick » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:29 pm

I hope I can answer the original question. Here in Scotland (and maybe all of the UK?) we receive "Bank Giro Credits" to make payments with. Maybe these are different to Remittances, because they do not insist you return them with the payment?

Anyway, they tend to end in the numbers 73 or 74. The body in the UK that can answer questions about BCGs can be found at ukpayments.org.uk - I tried to find out if these numbers indicated a Remittance. What I found out was that: "code 73 is a consumer credit and mail order credit and code 74 is consumer credit and mail order credit full length joint giro credit."

OK so I do not really know what exactly what this means yet, although the word CREDIT suggests that they have value. Here's my full communications with them:


Dear Sirs,
I hope you can help with my enquiry. I am an individual who occasionally uses Bank Giro Credits. I have recently become very interested in the study of law, especially pertaining to any documents that I have to sign. Having looked at various BCGs in detail, the only part of them that make no sense to me is the codeline at the foot. I have noted that they usually end in number 73, sometimes number 74. As I am using a service which, according to the C&CCC website, you are authorised to answer my questions on, I am seeking detailed clarification on what the numbers at the foot of BCGs mean.
With thanks, Jonathan

Dear Jonathan,
Thank you for your email dated 1 March 2010 regarding BCG Codeline. I would advise that the numbers at the bottom of a Bank Giro Credit are normally numeric characters which are used by bank clearing departments to direct credits to the correct bank and the correct account. These numbers can be printed in what we call MICR (Magnetic Ink Character Recognition) characters - this is magnetic printing and the magnetic characters are read by the bank clearing departments OR they can also be printed in OCR (Optical Character Recognition) where the shape of each character is the way of reading it. There are five groups of these numbers and from the left as you are looking at the document the fields are as follows: Serial Number: If the codeline is printed in OCR this field can be 18 characters long and may contain alpha characters - if in MICR the length of the field is 6 characters and can only contain numeric characters. Sort Code : a 6 digit numeric number which indicates which banks the credit should be directed to. Account Number : an 8 digit numeric number which indicates the account holder to which the credit should be applied. Transaction Code : a 2 digit numeric number which indicates the type of credit to the banks concerned. The amount field : an 11 digit number which contains the amount of the credit. I hope this is of assistance.
Kind regards, Sumitra

Dear Sumitra,
Thank you very much for your swift response. I understand from your message regarding the BCG codeline that: The serial number is referenced by the first group of digits. This I can see by matching it with the reference number that the organisation has assigned to my name. The second group of digits references the organisations sort code and the third references their bank account number; this is plain and straightforward. The third group of digits is the one that still causes me confusion; the two digit "transaction code". I would like to know exactly what kind of transaction I am carrying out when I fill in these BCGs. For example, would digits 73/74 indicate that the object is in fact a remittance? Where can I find detailed descriptors for the transaction codes and what they really mean?
With many thanks and best wishes, Jonathan

Dear Jonathan,
Further to your email dated 2 March 2010, I would advise that code 73 is a consumer credit and mail order credit and code 74 is consumer credit and mail order credit full length joint giro credit. I would further advise that there is a standard around transaction codes which contains more information and an electronic copy is available through kathy.ryan@ukpayments.org.uk for £11.11 + VAT. I hope this is of some assistance.
Kind regards, Sumitra
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby mark1963 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 1:11 pm

Those emails strongly suggest they are numbers related to a line of consumer credit. Yes, my remittances are in the form of Giro's as well.

Good, now I'm going to A4V and test the water.

Can someone point me in the direction of how to do a Notice of Non-Response and Opportunity to Cure?

I have read the details before but I find it sticks in best when I actually do these things.
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Re: The 96 fix

Postby nillz123 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:43 pm

Has anyone had success with method B? I have never heard of this method.

For Method A: Is there anyway that you can write on there a time frame giving the IRS XX amount of days to settle the

account?

traderfluff wrote:I came across this US A4V method for anyone who needs instruction..... funny enough they use stamps on their slips..

TWO - METHODS TO SETTLE A BILL. (Your choice, more than one way to skin a cat!)
It all starts out from the Private Creditor’s side of the looking glass. (No matter who the Credit Requestor is.)
1. Phone company gives a Credit Request with a list customers attached to the United States Department of the Treasury to draw on as the Drawer of the CREDIT , then they loan it to the Phone company but the Credit is really Drawn against Individual Warehoused accounts (these are our in-Trusted assets), so we are the Drawee.
Now comes the other side of the looking glass. (the Public side)
2. Phone company uses the Credit to operate with and then sends out the Bill to the customers whose Credit they are using. Well the Bill is really to be a Payment for the Usage of our Credit.
3. To Claim the payment for its Value there are Two methods to chose from but everybody talks as though there is only one. You are now the Drawer and the Phone company is the Drawee.(when it is coming out of the public side)

A. A4V/R4V Method: (Bill gets paid only)
FRONT SIDE – at a 45° angle
1. Accept For Value – Exempt from Levy.
2. Deposit to the account of the United States Department of the Treasury.
3. In the name of STRAWMAN BANK SSN# account. (gets deposited into your account)
4. Credited from Phone Company. (their liability is settled for this amount)
5. Sign and Date it blue ink.
6. Title “Authorized Representative” or “Beneficial Owner”
BACK SIDE
7. Accept For Value – Without Recourse
8. Without Prejudice
9. Sign and Date
10. 2¢ stamp then cancel it.
11. Then send it to the IRS. (you do not get notified when it is settled)


B. The Cash in Your Pocket Method: (Bill gets paid and you get paid the Credited Assets for your understanding )
They won’t like this one but it is one Lawful way to get access to our accounts assets, using their own words.
FRONT SIDE – at a 45° angle
1. Accepted For Value as the Drawer (you are drawing it away from the original borrower)
2. Deposit to the account of the United States Department of the Treasury.
3. The Associated Public Debt owed to STRAWMAN Bank SSN# account is CANCELLED per attached 1099-C. (The United States Department of the Treasury is the Debtor here.)
4. Further Pay to the Order of: Your Commercial Name person - for Full Amount. (as Special Drawing Rights over the Trust account.)
5. This amount of Liability to be cancelled and to Credited as from Phone Company as the Drawee. (they just made the payment back to our side)
6. Sign and Date it blue ink.
7. Title “Beneficial Owner”
BACK SIDE – simple endorsement
1. Sign and Date it blue ink.
2. Title “Beneficial Owner”.
3. 2¢ or 3¢ stamp then cancel it.
4. Then send it Registered Mail, with at least $1 of real stamps.
5. Put the Registered Mail # on your cover letter, the bill and in the account space on the 1099-C.
(You now have them under a Commercial Contract with a 3 day settlement time frame.) You know it is settled when you get the check.
6. Send to:
Customer Service #3, at Bureau of Public Debt
Bank of New York, att. Bond Processing, Dallas Texas
or where the 5396 form is mailed.
Patrick
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